Security Dealer & Integrator

SEP 2018

Find news and information for the executive corporate security director, CSO, facility manager and assets protection manager on issues of policy, products, incidents, risk management, threat assessments and preparedness.

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40 Security Dealer & Integrator / www.SecurityInfoWatch.com September 2018 Oxford: Securing a higher-education campus is like trying to secure a small city. (ere are) buildings spread across hundreds of acres, and then we have to deal with var- ied infrastructure – buildings that were constructed over decades and, oen, aging security systems. We have to make it work until we can migrate the campus to newer, more modern technology. What technologies do you install most often? Montalvo: Video is still the best product for providing forensic evidence and information for campus security offi- cers to respond to incidents. Access systems control build- ing access and provide audit trails. Blue-light systems offer a sense of security not only to students but also to parents, and I am one of those. e first thing I looked for when I walked on a campus with my two girls were the blue lights, then I asked how many cameras had been installed. Oxford: I agree with Rich – video is most important, but how do they use it? Adding analytics, whether they are built into a system or from a third party, greatly reduces the time needed for forensic research and helps cam- puses become more proactive rather than reactive in their approach to security. Dorrian: If I had to pick just one technology, it would be video surveillance. It is the most important tool cam- puses are using. On a weekly basis, we are working with the campus and/or city police departments to go back and find video for some campus event. What overlooked security tool is your favorite? Oxford: I like a service and maintenance soware tool we provide our customers that enables us to partner with administrators to monitor systems and ensure all compo- nents are fully functional. at helps the campus get maxi- mum benefit from its security investment. Dorrian: I agree. We had one campus pass on a service and maintenance agreement due to budget constraints, only to come back a year later and sign up for it again. In the year they didn't have it, they saw the tremendous value the SMA provided them – it is a true asset for any college or university. Montalvo: I keep looking at the all the mobile devices on a campus. Every student has a mobile phone – I think they are surgically attached to their hands. en I look for ways to leverage that for (a campus') commu- nication and mass notification needs; also, with their built-in cameras, the phones could provide a campus with thousands of extra eyes and ears. What other newer security technologies are being used? Montalvo: Gunshot detec- tion systems are being looked at more frequently; and so is social media monitoring soware. Most of the recent tragic cam- pus incidents had signs on social media that, if caught in advance, may have helped to mitigate or prevent attacks. Oxford: We are seeing a greater need for incident management. Social media monitoring would help (in that regard) – it is amazing how quickly a social media post can gather students and other people into a potentially dangerous mob. e more information campus security officers have, the faster they can react. How do you handle the big events like football games and concerts? Dorrian: We frequently deal with events that attract between 10,000 and 75,000 people. For the bigger events, we will have a staff member in attendance. e systems we put in place are critical for maintaining security. Halime at a football game is no time for a system failure – if some- thing does go awry, we can immediately react. Oxford: We try to be a partner in planning security for the big events. First, you want to make sure your security systems are well-maintained; then, we do a lot of work on traffic management. at may not sound technolo- gy-driven, but when campus security can manage traf- fic from a single location using video, access and other systems we have put into place, everyone gets a better game-day experience. "The first thing I looked for when I walked on a campus with my two girls were the blue lights, then I asked how many cameras had been installed." — Rich Montalvo, Security 101 - Fort Lauderdale, Miami, Palm Beach and Tampa Back to School SECURITY

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