Security Dealer & Integrator

SEP 2018

Find news and information for the executive corporate security director, CSO, facility manager and assets protection manager on issues of policy, products, incidents, risk management, threat assessments and preparedness.

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48 Security Dealer & Integrator / www.SecurityInfoWatch.com September 2018 Back to School SECURITY I n this era of school security awareness and the search for viable solutions, you have undoubtedly seen – either on your local news or on the web – demonstrations and deployments of secondary door locking devices that wedge, jam or bar shut a classroom door opening. At first glance, these aer-market devices appear to make sense – they promise an additional way to make schools safer by providing an added way to secure a door. What those local newscasts usually fail to mention is that these devices almost universally make things more dangerous for stu- dents and staff. In almost every case, these devices are a violation of fire code – a code so effective, in fact, that the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports that 1958 was the last time a school fire resulted in more than 10 deaths. ere are some cases where a variance to fire code has been adopted to allow certain types of secondary locking devices, but they are few and far between. Nation- ally-recognized best practices still exist for nearly all jurisdictions – that doors must be unobstructed and allow free egress to students and staff. Furthermore, secondary locking devices may cause more problems than they solve in an emergency if they barricade doors in such a way that school staff or first responders can not open the door. If an individ- ual creates a dangerous situation for The Danger of Non-Compliance Many secondary locking products violate code and should not be deployed in schools – find alternatives for your K-12 customers By Ron Baer After-market secondary locking devices such as barricades and floor locks are almost always in violation of NFPA and other codes.

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